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FAFR


Course: Physical Aspects of Plant Physiology

Department/Abbreviation: KBF/FAFR

Year: 2019

Guarantee: 'prof. RNDr. Jan Nauš, CSc.'

Annotation: Cells and diffusion. Water in plant cell. Energy budgets.

Course review:
1) Electrical properties of plants Electrical conductivity and photoconductivity of materials. Conductivity of biological materials. Experimental set-up for measurement of steady state conductivity and photoconductivity. Conductometry and measuring methods, examples of application in biophysics. Ion leakage. Lipid peroxidation. 2) Electrical potentials Measurement of electrical potentials of plants. Action and variation potentials. Voltage-gated channels in thylakoids. Relation between electric potentials and plant stresses. Microelectrodes and the patch-clamp method. Membrane potential and its measurement. 3) Magnetic properties Methods of NMR and EPR and their application in plant physiology. Measurements of water distribution in leaves, detection of ROS by the method of spin-trapping. The effect of electric and magnetic and electromagnetic fields on plants. 4) Thermic methods Thermometry of plants. Measurements of plant tissue temperature. Fluxes and accumulation of heat in plants. Thermic methods and their application in plant physiology (DTA, DSC, calo-respirometry, thermo-imaging). 5)Optical properties Spectra of reflectance and transmittance. The spectrum of absorptance. Measurements using the integration sphere. Measurements of chloroplast movement. Multilayer method and the method of light pipes. Optical indexes of plants and their meaning. Chlorophyll-meters and the meters of plant optical indexes (NDVI, etc.). Multispectral cameras. Methods of differential absorption. 6)Mechanical properties of plants Biomechanics and hydromechanics of plants. Xylem and floem transport. 7)Environmental biophysics of plants Air temperature and humidity. Measurements of the air humidity. Transport of heat and material, fluxes. Radiation and absorption of energy. Wind. Water and heat relations in soil. The light in canopy. Movement of air.